The load on a generator during an EQ charge

Mate3 and Mate3s communications devices for Outback Power
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pioneerMan
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My RE system: 12 volt system
26 lead acid batteries, 6V, each rated at 210 amp hours
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Mate 3d
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Location: Northern Utah

The load on a generator during an EQ charge

Post by pioneerMan »

When I setup the EQ charge on the Mate, I then went over to the other shed and checked what kind of load the Westinghouse was experiencing. It's LEDs lit up to the 50% mark. Considering we need to allow for the times when the water pump comes on, which uses about 900 watts, is this a good overall load? Or should I adjust the Mate settings so that it takes on more power from the generator?

Here is my model, which we only run on propane:
https://westinghouseoutdoorpower.com/co ... -dual-fuel

Rating:
4500/4050 Peak Watts and 3700/3330 Rated Watts (Gas/Propane)

Thank you.

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raysun
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My RE system: Flexpower Two: (2) FXR3048A, (2) FM80, MATE3s, FlexNetDC
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REC Alpha 440W panels - 2 arrays: each of 4 strings of 2 in series
Honda EU7000is gas fuel generator

Re: The load on a generator during an EQ charge

Post by raysun »

pioneerMan wrote: Mon Mar 22, 2021 11:58 am When I setup the EQ charge on the Mate, I then went over to the other shed and checked what kind of load the Westinghouse was experiencing. It's LEDs lit up to the 50% mark. Considering we need to allow for the times when the water pump comes on, which uses about 900 watts, is this a good overall load? Or should I adjust the Mate settings so that it takes on more power from the generator?

Here is my model, which we only run on propane:
https://westinghouseoutdoorpower.com/co ... -dual-fuel

Rating:
4500/4050 Peak Watts and 3700/3330 Rated Watts (Gas/Propane)

Thank you.


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Two things:

#1 The battery MUST be fully charged before starting an EQ charge.

#2 If running an EQ charge (for the first time ever) on a very large battery in suspect state of health, its very likely the charging current is going to be very high. Also, it will probably be uneven between the various parallel strings.

If a relatively healthy battery was being EQ charged, the initial charging current would be in the vicinity of 1.5-2% of C20 capacity. Doing some very rough estimates, 13 parallel strings @ 210AH each would be 13 x 210AH = 2730AH @ 1.5-2% ~ 40-55ADC.

It sounds like the generator is delivering in the vicinity of 15AAC which would be roughly 150ADC x .8 = 120ADC to the battery.

It was suggested partitioning the battery into smaller banks for the purpose of EQ charging. This was partly to reduce charge current demand, and partly to help identify individual blocks that have compromised cells.

In the current scenario, either the battery did not start fully charged (stop EQ immediately) or the EQ cycle is pouring expensive electrons into a bucket with a big hole somewhere in the bottom.
provo
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Re: The load on a generator during an EQ charge

Post by provo »

Do you own one of these, or something like it?

Screen Shot 2021-03-22 at 1.52.58 PM.png

With that many parallel strings, it would be nice to know how much current was going through each string. Could help you diagnose some problems very easily.
pss
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My RE system: 8330 watts in three strings, Flexmax 60 x 3, Radian 8048A, GSLC load center, Mate 3S, Hub 10.3, FN-DC and 900 Amp, 48V Trojan T105-RE battery bank.

Re: The load on a generator during an EQ charge

Post by pss »

I think if you have not equalized your batteries for a long period of time or ever, start out as follows: If say your desired equalization is 62 volts for 3 hours, start out by checking the water level in the batteries and mix up the electrolyte with say your hydrometer and inspect the fluid. It should be very close to clear and the batteries should be near 100% charged before starting equalization. If the fluid is turbid, note the color and look to compare with photos online. If the fluid is low, top it off. Then start with a much shorter time period, say 30 minutes and instead of 62 volts, begin at 58. Listen to your batteries for bubbling and make certain your generator is performing okay and there is no liquid coming out of batteries. Then if all went well, advance the time to like an hour and up the voltage to say 60. Observe the batteries for gassing noises and bubbling over and your generator. If this second test goes okay, then proceed towards your full optimal equalization and observe for signs of trouble like bubbling over or generator not keeping up the proper voltage. If all goes well, re-inspect your fluid with hydrometer and make sure it is clear. Then you should be good to go with whatever program you want to follow. I am currently following every 15 days on Trojan T105RE at 62 volts for 3 hours.
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